Tag Archives: activities

Winter’s Delight

by Corey Hockett

Some of the greatest moments of winter outings come as anticipation before and ravishment after. Indeed, fueling up and winding down is a big part of what makes these excursions so attractive. What beats raising a glass with your buddies at the end of an epic powder day? How good does that first sip of coffee taste before a weekend road trip? These periods of transition provide your getaway with wholesomeness. And in Bozeman, where there is no lack of adventures to choose from, après (and avant) is no different.

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Fueling Up
In winter, it’s hard to leave the coziness of the comforter and strike out into the cold. Get started with hot drinks and warm sandwiches from one of our standout coffee shops and delis. If you’re headed up Bridger Canyon to the ski hill, Crosscut, or Brackett Creek, hit Ghost Town for smooth-sipping coffee and a hefty breakfast burrito. If you’re eastbound on the interstate toward Paradise Valley, pick up a warm cup o’ tea at Townshend’s. Going west, you say? Fill up at Wheat Montana at the junction of Hwy. 287 and score a serious bang for your buck with a Belt burritos. The classic rendezvous locale south of town is Slider’s Deli at the mouth of Big Sky. Grab a coffee on your way through, or, if you’re ending the day early, stop in for a sandwich or burger before your trip home. Last but certainly not least: if you’re planning a half-day at Bridger, pick up a giant Pickle Barrel sandwich and chow down on your way to the hill.

Winding Down
Ski hills are the quintessential locales for après. If you’re wrapping up a day at Bridger Bowl, you’ve got options. It’s always worth having one (just one, if you’re driving) on the hill, and for this I recommend the Grizzly Ridge Station (aka, the Griz). We’re talkin’ $3 pints here. Of Olympia, that is; but let’s face it, you’re looking for something light anyway. Face Shots in the Jim Bridger Lodge is also tried and true. Got a designated driver with you? Have one at each.

If Big Sky is your choice of exploit, you have plenty of choices as well—just be prepared to loosen the purse strings. Scissor Bills is a local favorite. Amongst the mass of infrastructure, this homey saloon overlooks the base area and has plenty of room to spread out. Have a round by the window where an upper-level perspective grants great views of the base area.

Beers are fine and dandy, but if you’re itching for something with a little more zip—something that burns the throat and warms the belly—Bozeman has an exceptional spread of distilleries. Check out Wildrye in the Cannery District and Bozeman Spirits downtown. On the way back from Bridger, stop into Valhalla Meadery for a unique, historic libation to warm your frozen insides. If you happen to be passing through Ennis, don’t miss Willie’s on the main drag—their Bighorn Bourbon rivals any whiskey in the West.

Speaking of small-town spots, some of the most pleasant après experiences are away from the Bozeman bustle—wood-door saloons, old-time taxidermy bars, and venues with no dress code whatsoever. On your next trip to Yellowstone, stop in at the Antler Pub & Grill for a western Montana meal at its finest. Heading north? Hit Canyon Ferry Brewing in Townsend after ice fishing the reservoir. In Ennis, you’ll find great beer and delicious food at Burnt Tree Brewing, across the street from Willie’s.

These are just a few of our favorite places—there are plenty more. But don’t take our word for it, get out and try for yourself. The more places you try, the better notion you’ll have of all the options to suit your winter’s day. Bozeman is a mountain town, and its après reflects that. Experience it wearing your ski pants, laughing with friends, and repping a goggle tan—the rest of us will be out there doing the same.

Springs Break

Some like it hot.

by Corey Hockett

Soaking in hot springs, aka “hot-potting,” is a universal and timeless pleasure. Nothing beats the sensation of slipping into slightly stinging water, only to feel comfy and tranquil seconds later. Whether you’ve had a great day on the slopes, been in the library too long, or just have an afternoon off, these are the spots in which to soak your bones.

Lap of Luxury
For those into a well-developed, plush backdrop, check out these commercial pools for a luxurious soak.

Bozeman Hot Springs
Status: Developed
Access: Open to the public
Admission: $8.50
Location: 8 miles west of Bozeman

Courtesy_Boz-hot-springs2This massive facility recently underwent renovation and now has nine pools, both inside and out. It has wet and dry saunas, a fitness center, and campground. If you’re coming back from Big Sky or don’t want to travel far, this is your place.

 

Chico Hot Springs
Status: Developed
Access: Open to the public as well as to registered guests
Admission: $7.50 for adults; less for kids. Guests soak free
Location: 22 miles south of Livingston

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Located in Paradise Valley, just south of Livingston, Chico provides two refreshing pools and an assortment of accommodation options for overnighters. Check it out if your family is in town or you’re looking for a romantic weekend getaway.

Norris Hot Springs
Status: Developed
Access: Open to the public
Admission: $7 for adults; reduced for kids and seniors
Location: 35 miles west of Bozeman

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This 30’ x 40’ pool is a collection of geothermal springs located near the Madison River. Dubbed “Water of the Gods” by the current owner, Norris has live music every Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Added bonus: be the DD and get in for free.

 

Simple Soaking
If you’re the less-is-more type, or prefer nature to civilization, these are your hot spots.

Boiling River
Status: Primitive
Access: Unrestricted (Yellowstone Park pass required)
Admission: Park pass is $35 for single vehicle
Location: 2 miles south of Gardiner

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Just inside the Gardiner entrance to Yellowstone National Park, scalding channels mingle with the cold river water to form the perfect temperature for soaking—and this set of pools is only a half-mile walk from the parking lot. This gem is a must, but expect crowds.

Potosi Hot Springs
Status: Primitive
Access: Open to the public
Admission: Free
Location: 8 miles west of Pony
Head to Pony and travel southwest on Potosi Rd. / South Willow Creek Rd. Follow the signs to the campground and then venture the mile-long trail back down the creek to the spring. It’s not the warmest pool around, but it’s sized nicely for a group of 6-8.

Renova Hot Springs
Status: Primitive
Access: Open to the public
Admission: Free
Location: 10 miles south of Whitehall
Head south of Whitehall on Hwy. 55, taking the Waterloo turnoff. The road deposits you a quarter-mile from the spring, where you can bathe in rock-lined pools along a side-channel of the Jefferson River. The river mixes with warmer thermal water in two separate hot-water seeps, creating a variety of soaking temperatures. Check the river flow beforehand; at high water, the pools can get washed out.