Tag Archives: blue light

The Blue Light’s Blinking

by David Tucker

An introduction to becoming a Bozemanite.

My first winter in Bozeman, the blue light atop downtown’s Baxter Hotel blinked almost every day. In December, I didn’t know what the light meant; I just assumed it always blinked.

Then one day, a fellow Bridger Bowl ski instructor explained the light’s significance: every time the ski hill reports two or more inches of fresh snow, the light blinks.

It’s Bozeman’s invitation to powder.

A Bozeman winter under the Big Sky.

A Bozeman winter under the Big Sky.

Late at night, after catching a show or a bite downtown, I’d wander back to my car and see the light flashing. A smile would spread across my face. Anticipation would build inside me, excitement for soft turns and good times.

That’s our goal with this guide: we want to invite you to enjoy Bozeman’s outdoor offerings. And not just the skiing, but the hiking, biking, climbing, hunting, fishing, and floating. Whether you’re here for four years of college or plan on staying a lifetime, we want you to take advantage of all Bozeman has to offer.

With this guide in-hand, you’ll gain entry into an exclusive world of outdoor adventure that has become the Bozeman way of life. But keep in mind: with that access comes responsibility. You’re obligated to look after these forests, rivers, mountains, and trails. Be stewards, and leave them as you found them, for the next generation of students.

Main Street, Bozeman.

Main Street, Bozeman.

In between outings, venture downtown and partake in Bozeman’s unique combination of small-town hospitality and big-city possibility. To soften the blow of those big-city-like prices, we’ve also packed this guide with dozens of cash-saving coupons, good for everything from two-for-one coffees to discounted dorm furniture. Save where you can, and spend the extra on a climbing trip or fly-fishing lessons.

So now that you’re here, accept the invitation. Take the guide, make plans, and follow through. The blue light will soon be blinking, and a smile will spread across your face. The anticipation will build and you’ll have the information you need to make the most of it.

Welcome to Bozeman.

Coveted Courses

by Jack Taylor

Lucky you, to have landed in Montana’s epicenter for outdoor recreation. Soaring ridgelines beckon to be traversed, roaring rapids call for you to make a run, and blankets of cold smoke beg your legs to carve them up. No matter the activity, Bozeman offers the very best, and you’re bound to pick up a new outdoor hobby. But don’t get ahead of yourself—our mountains and rivers take no prisoners. Get started on the right foot with an instructional course, because when shit hits the fan, a little learnin’ goes a long way.

DPogge_Snowpit2

Wilderness First Aid
If you haven’t taken one yet, a WFA course through a local outfit like Crossing Latitudes is a must. These two-day clinics (typically held on weekends) cover everything you need to keep an injured friend (or yourself) safe until the pros arrive. They’re a bit pricey, but well worth the investment. If you plan on finding yourself deep in the backcountry, hours or even days from help, go all in and sign up for a Wilderness First Responder. This professional-level, week-long course is comprehensive and covers most potential ailments and injuries.

Avalanche Education
Looking to ski in the backcountry this winter? Get some avalanche training. Each fall and winter, the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center runs free hour-long seminars all over town, but do yourself a favor and get a more in-depth certification with one of their multi-day Level 1 courses. If you’re after a more immersive experience, Big Sky Backcountry Guides runs Level 1 and 2 courses from its yurt in the Tobacco Roots, and Beartooth Powder Guides offers courses in Cooke City.

Paddling Skills
From lazy meandering floats to Class IV whitewater, southwest Montana’s rivers provide amazing opportunities to progress as a paddler. Check out Wave Train Kayak Team’s programs to hone your skills before diving head-first into the Mad Mile. In addition to clinics and private instruction, Wave Train provides multi-day whitewater trips to members of its summer paddling teams. 

Swiftwater Rescue
For boating enthusiasts, swiftwater-rescue training is a must. The creeks and rivers most folks run in the spring are cold, full of strainers, and downright dangerous. Learn safety skills from the pros at Montana Whitewater to avoid heading up a creek without a paddle. If you plan on leading whitewater trips, Guide School is a great option as well. It’s required for Montana Whitewater employees, but open to interested members of the general public.

Rope Skills
No matter your level of climbing experience, you can always add to your repertoire of technical skills. Whether you’re putting on rock shoes and a harness for the first time, or ogling Hyalite’s multi-pitch ice, you’re certain to find a course that will up your game in the vertical realm. Spire offers a range of instruction from basic lead climbing to multi-pitch techniques. For the next level, check out Montana Alpine Guides’ assortment of rock- and ice-climbing clinics.

Navigation
Technology has made it all too easy to think that you know where you’re going, but for better or worse (read: better), most areas you’ll be venturing to in southwest Montana are devoid of cell service. Keep it simple: learn how to use a map and compass. AIM Adventure U provides online navigation courses to keep you on the right track. Or, check out a book from the library on orienteering—the art is as old as history.

Survival
Maybe you’re content with sticking to day hikes on popular trails close to town. But if you want to experience the unadulterated wilderness, you’ll benefit from picking up some backcountry survival skills. Green University, based in nearby Pony, offers immersive courses on topics such as foraging for edible plants, making primitive tools, hunting wild game, and building shelters. Who knows, maybe you’ll make a home in the mountains, drop out of school, quit your job, and become a bona fide backcountry badass.