Category Archives: Trailhead

Know the Code

by  Ej Porth

A few rules for Bozeman area trails.

We’re pretty lucky to have the 80-mile Main Street to the Mountains trail system right outside our back door. From campus, you can get downtown or to the top of a mountain—the options are endless. Bikers, runners, dog owners, commuters, and walkers keep the trails busy, making it everyone’s responsibility to follow the rules so we can care for our community trails and respect fellow users. Being a good trail user is a big deal here in Bozeman. Nothing gets you more glares and frustrated sighs than bad trail etiquette. But don’t worry—we’ll give you the lowdown on how to fit in and do your part. Here’s what you can do to be an A+ trail user.

Obey the posted signs and trail regulations. If a trail is closed, it’s closed for a reason. If a sign tells you to slow down on your bike, hit the brakes.

Stay on the trail. It might seem like a good idea to take a shortcut between switchbacks, but this can actually create serious damage to the trail. We need to respect the natural areas around the trail as well. On that note, don’t pick the flowers.

Don’t bike or walk on the muddy trails. Especially In the springtime, using muddy trails can cause serious damage and may require significant repair later on. Follow some of the Bozeman trail conditions on Facebook to see what trails are dry and ready to use.

Stay right on the trail. Just like when you’re driving, pass on the left.

Don’t litter. Duh.

If you’re a biker, yield to walkers. They have right of way. Slow down, use a bell, or call out “On your left!” before passing.

Downhill bike riders yield to uphill bike riders. It’s safer and easier for everyone.

If you bring a dog, PICK UP THE POOP! There are dog-poop stations with bags and trash cans all along the trail system. Don’t just pick it up and leave the bag on the side of the trail. You’ll forget about it. Ignoring your dog’s poop will bring very bad trail karma your way.

Obey leash rules. You’re representing all dog owners—help us look good. And no, your dog is not an exception to the rule because it’s “really well-behaved.” We all think that about our dogs, but it isn’t always true.

Pick up a Main Street to the Mountains trail map at the Gallatin Valley Land Trust office (212 S. Wallace, #102) or at local retailers.

The Most Dangerous Game

by the editors

The Montana mountains may be a refuge from the strains of life, but they too come with their fair share of stress—mainly, the not-so-friendly creatures that call them home. With a little awareness and education, though, you’ll escape your encounters with nothing but a great story. Here’s what’s out there, and what to do when you meet the locals.

Mountain Lion (Puma concolor)
Where to Find It: Mountains, but may roam urban areas in search of prey. Most active at dusk.

How to Avoid Trouble: At night, wear an extra headlamp facing backward. The light will blind a mountain lion and discourage it from stalking you.

If Trouble Finds You: Stand upright and face the cougar. Make a lot of noise and if attacked, fight back. Never run.

Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Where to Find It: If you’re in the mountains of Montana, you’re in bear country.

How to Avoid Trouble: Carry bear spray and store your food safely—in a bear canister or hung up. Be noisy so you don’t surprise one. 

If Trouble Finds You: Avoid eye contact and stay calm. Slowly back away from the bear. If it charges, wait till it’s about 30 feet away, then let the spray fly. Should the spray not stop it, submit completely—collapse onto your stomach, use your hands to protect your head and neck, and pray to whatever gods you can think of.

Moose (Alces americanus)
Where to Find It: Open grassy fields, marshlands, and moist drainages.

How to Avoid Trouble: Make noise when out hiking and biking, and carry bear spray just in case. 

If Trouble Finds You: If it’s blocking your way, wait it out. If it charges, run away and get a tree between you and the angry moose. A squirt of bear spray should send it running.

Prairie Rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis)
Where to Find It: Dens, under rocks, houses, or anywhere else a snake can fit in open, arid country. The banks of the Madison are prime real estate in the warmer months.

How to Avoid Trouble: Listen for the rattle and keep your distance. Avoid reaching into dark places and running through sagebrush.

The Blue Light District

by Cordelia Pryor

Welcome to Bozeman! Whether you’re a student, ski bum, trout bum, young professional, remote worker, retiree, or a traveler just passing through, Bozeman has a plethora of top-notch outdoor-recreation opportunities to offer. But where to begin? Finding one’s way in a new locale is no mean feat. Worry not, friend—the Blue LightGuide is here to help.

New to the outdoors, or at least the Montana variety? Inside this guide you’ll find tons of useful info, from gear and etiquette tips to the area’s top fishing spots and biking trails. Tight on cash? The coupons in the back can feed, clothe, and outfit you for all your excursions. Day or night, total newbie or just looking for some pointers, this guide has something for everyone, every season.

Whence the name, you ask? Well, atop the iconic Baxter Hotel is a blue light that flashes whenever Bridger Bowl gets two inches of fresh snow or more. As that flashing bulb ushers skiers to Bridger’s snow-covered slopes, we hope this guide ushers you to Bozeman’s outdoors: the fields, forests, mountains, and rivers that make this place so special.

However you choose to take to the trails—by foot, bike, or ski—the Gallatin Valley welcomes you warmly with an abundance of wildlife, awe-inspiring views, and new challenges each day. Make no mistake, this place has its pitfalls—winter can be brutal, summer hot and smoky, spring muddy and unpredictable, and fall nonexistent. But amid it all, there is a singular Montana splendor, and this guide will help you find it.

So, while you’re out there enjoying everything Bozeman has to offer, remind yourself of how lucky you are to have found this place. Endless opportunity awaits and all you have to do is reach out and grab it. Once again: welcome, and we hope to see you out there, reaching for fun and fulfillment in all directions. Good luck, and Godspeed.